[eDebate] Genetics-don't count it out.

scottelliott at grandecom.net scottelliott
Sun Apr 6 17:26:38 CDT 2008


I am concerned that we will immediately jump back into another international
affiars debate topic after spending an entire year on the Middle East. It may
become nothing more than  ".... [insert new country here]" debates that
virtually mirror the Mideast debate. Example, can we seriously expect the
Russia debate to not involve Iranian denuclearization or discussions of the EU?

The problem with most domestic topics is that the elections and politics
debates, especially this year, will trump most case advantages. Reparations
would be good for a semester, but I doubt it would be enough for an entire
year. Urban policy may not be enough to trump the standard negative positions.

I revised the genetic engineering paper and have resubmitted it to the Topic
Committee. I think that it offers the best of both domestic and international
concerns. The topic covers areas of race and gender like no previous topic and
the international side (read EU, Russia and Latin America) have been covered.
The critical/philosophical ground on both sides is pretty amazing too. It would
be nice to listen to debates in which the critique authors actually discuss the
policy implications of their criticisms and have direct application to the
topic at hand. (see, e.g. Heidegger, Habermas and Zizek). I have even added a
section regarding politics and the upcoming elections. When the paper is posted
onto the Topic Blog, I encourage you all to consider it. If you want an advance
look, please e-mail me back. The proposed resolutions I settled on are:

1.  	Resolved: the United States Federal Government should substantially
restrict the research, development or use of recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid
genetic engineering through legislation, regulation or formal international
agreement.

2.  	Resolved: the United States Federal Government should substantially
restrict the research, development or use of genetic engineering through
legislation, regulation or formal international agreement.

3. Resolved: the United States Federal Government should substantially restrict
research, development, or use of genetic engineering.

4. Resolved the United States Federal Government should ban research, use or
development of genetic engineering.


Scott Elliott









More information about the Mailman mailing list