[eDebate] Fwd: From my Northbrook Friend...

Calum Matheson u.hrair
Wed May 7 14:38:14 CDT 2008


To: Calum Matheson <u.hrair at gmail.com>


Re: http://www.ndtceda.com/pipermail/edebate/2008-May/075075.html
[eDebate] Russia topic, part 2
Dylan Keenan dylan.keenan at gmail.com

The environment Aff is not topical under the "security cooperation" wording,
so I am disregarding it. Also, US-Russia environmental cooperation and the
military role in environmental security are deep literatures - almost, but
not quite, as deep as the ones I'm documenting here, so I think the other
two Affs are sufficient prove my point.

The research shown here took me 90 minutes. It was very taxing and made my
brain work at high speed, which made me sad and tired. Anyone who votes
against health care is voting against talking about my illness and must hate
me. But... if my personal tragedy is not to be the focus of the community's
discussion for the year, then I suppose I might be forced to think about
Russia. So I did, and I found out that everything in this post about the two
security cooperation Affs was incorrect. Since this proves a point I made
about research-related laziness on edebate a little while ago, I decided to
spend some quality time with google.

None of the cites in here include the relevant generic arguments against:
aid to Russia (CTR), security assistance, US-Russian military-to-military
cooperation, or arms/tech transfer to the Russian security forces. None of
it includes references to my "security cooperation generally" citations that
you (Calum) posted to edebate. That's okay because neither does Dylan.

Conceptual notes for the ISTC Aff:

1) This is a "defense conversion bad" case. Defense conversion is one of the
core security cooperation activities undertaken by the US and Russia. It is
not something I pulled from nowhere.

See:
http://www.iiss.org/publications/adelphi-papers/2005-adelphi-papers/ap-377-revitalising-us-russian-security
AP 377: Revitalising US?Russian Security Cooperation: Practical Measures
Richard Weitz
Near-term results in the areas of formal arms control or ballistic missile
defences are unlikely. The two governments should focus on improving and
expanding their joint threat-reduction and non-proliferation programmes,
enhancing their military-to-military dialogue regarding Central Asia and
defence industrial cooperation, and deepening their anti-terrorist
cooperation, both bilaterally and through NATO. Using more market
incentives, expanding reciprocity and equal treatment, and limiting the
adverse repercussions from disputes over Iran would facilitate progress.

Title :   From Confrontation to Cooperation Examining the Duality of
U.S.-Russian Security Cooperation as the Fulcrum of U.S.-Russian Relations
Descriptive Note : Strategy research project
Corporate Author : ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA
Personal Author(s) : Chance, Kenneth A.
Handle / proxy Url : http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA434644

Contemporary Economic Policy
Volume 16 Issue 4 Page 499-510, October 1998
To cite this article: MICHAEL V. ALEXEEV, RAYMOND C. SIKORRA (1998)
COMPARING POST-COLD WAR MILITARY CONVERSION IN THE UNITED STATES AND RUSSIA
Contemporary Economic Policy 16 (4) , 499?510
doi:10.1111/j.1465-7287.1998.tb00537.x
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1998.tb00537.x

Defense Conversion in the Former Soviet Union:
The Influence of Culture on the Strategic Planning Process
Lori A. Coakley and Linda M. Randall
http://iis-db.stanford.edu/pubs/10231/sedaitis.pdf#page=161

2) Dylan admits that CTR ground is good.
"For issues that have been around for a long time such as START
III or CTR there is depth of literature"

This is a CTR case, which becomes obvious once you start reading about it:
http://www.fas.org/spp/starwars/gao/nsiad97218.htm
Cooperative Threat Reduction: Review of DOD's June 1997 Report on Assistance
Provided (Letter Report, 09/05/97, GAO/NSIAD-97-218)
According to the State Department, through 1996 nearly $50 million\5
of CTR funding was provided to help support the ISTC in Russia,
including the branch offices recently opened in Belarus and
Kazakstan, and the STCU.  Although not described in DOD's report, 130
of the 320 ISTC projects underway received $41.5 million in CTR
funding.  The types of projects involved include safely disposing of
weapons-grade plutonium, improving nuclear power safety, destroying
chemical weapons, and protecting the environment.  Through 1996, the
United States provided $8 million of CTR funding to support 72 of the
87 ongoing STCU projects."

Then he says:
"many of these issues are better
accessed through arms control and even here the lit tends to be about
existing programs and funding versus not funding."
I don't even know where to begin with this. First, CTR is not part of our
disarmament commitments. If it is, this demonstrates the impossibly broad
nature of an arms control topic. Second, "funding vs. not funding" and
defenses or attacks on "existing programs" is the definition of literature
that compares the status quo to alternatives. For example, the Aff that he
showed everyone shifts funding from existing commercial conversion to a
focus on nonproliferation and energy (state sector) efforts. Therefore, all
the stuff that defends funding commercial spin-off efforts is offense or CP
ground. Obvi.

Here is the relevant stuff I found on this case (45 minutes, internet only,
no university access).

 For a full account of the beginnings of the ISTC, please refer to the book
Moscow DMZ by Glenn Schweitzer, published by M. E. Sharpe in 1996.
Sources:
[1] "ISTC page," Los Alamos National Laboratory Web Site,
http://www.lanl.gov/.
[2] Glenn E. Schweitzer, Moscow DMZ (Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharp Inc.,
1996),  pp. 44, 84, 97, 103, 107.
[3] Weapons of Mass Destruction: Reducing the Threat from the Former Soviet
Union: An Update, US General Accounting Office document GAO/NSIAD-95-165,
June 1995.
[4] "ISTC Organization Structure," ISTC Web Site, http://www.istc.ru.
[5] "Cooperative Science and Non-Proliferation:  The ISTC/STCU Experiment,"
International Institute of Strategic Studies, Vol. 8, No. 6, August 2002.
[6] "Joint Statement of the 14th Governing Board of the International
Science and Technology Center," ISTC Web Site,
http://www.istc.ru/istc/website.nsf/fm/z00GB14Statement, 5-6 November 1997.
[7] "Activity Summary," ISTC Web Site, http://www.istc.ru.
{Updated 10/9/02 CB}
cns.miis.edu/pubs/inven/pdfs/istc.pdf

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC): Supporting of
Nuclear Knowledge Progress through Ten Years International Cooperation
(Information Review) L.. Tochenya International Science and Technology
Center (ISTR), Moscow, Russia E-mail address of main author: tocheny at istc.ru
http://www.iaea.org/km/cnkm/abstracts/tochenrussia.pdf

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER
Redirecting Expertise in Weapons of Mass Destruction in the Former Soviet
Union
Office of International Affairs
National Research Council
NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.
1996
http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?isbn=0309056780


1. MORE THAN MONEY: SMALL TECHNOLOGY SPIN-OFFS OF THE WMD COMPLEX
By Maria Douglass and Peter Falatyn
(International Science & Technology Center, Moscow)
http://www.cdi.org/russia/johnson/6350-1.cfm

Sustainability of ISTC party funded projects
A report by an independent expert
Prof. Dr. Peter J. IDENBURG
Professor emiritus, Management of Technology
Delft University of Technology (NL)
"This report has been prepared under contract with the ISTC and paid from
funds
provided by the European Commission. It's findings are solely those of its
author(s)
and do not engage the Parties of the ISTC or the ISTC Secretariat."
http://ec.europa.eu/research/iscp/pdf/istc-sustainability_en.pdf

ISTC OBJECTIVES AND ACHIEVEMENTS:
AREAS OF POSSIBLE INTEGRATION WITH EURATOM
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
M. Kroening, D. Gambier, L. Tocheny, J.I. Pradas-Poveda ?
International Science and Technology Center (ISTC)
ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/fp5-euratom/docs/fisa2003_1_pradas_poveda_en.pdf

Redirection of Former Weapons Scientists
http://geo.international.gc.ca/cip-pic/library/rfws-en.aspx

PUBLIC SECTOR INCENTIVES FOR "HIGHER-VALUE-CHAIN" PRIVATE SECTOR
COOPERATION IN RUSSIA'S CLOSED NUCLEAR CITIES
Maria A. Douglass
Senior Technology Implementation Manager
International Science & Technology Center
Moscow, Russian Federation
http://in3.dem.ist.utl.pt/downloads/cur2000/posters/pos065.pdf

Science 3 April 1998:
Vol. 280. no. 5360, p. 15
DOI: 10.1126/science.280.5360.15d
Transition at Russian Physics Centers
Alain Gerard

Advancing
International Cooperation on
Bio-Initiatives in Russia and the CIS
Findings and Report from the April 26?27, 2005 Conference
http://www.centrovolta.it/landau/content/binary/REPORT_Bioinitiatives.pdf


EC/RUSSIA: GO-AHEAD FOR ISTC BUT DELAY FOR NUCLEAR COOPERATION
Publication: Europe Environment
Date: Tuesday, November 30 1993
Summary:
http://www.allbusiness.com/government/government-bodies-offices/8323488-1.html

Russian Nuclear Weapons Complex Workforce Downsizing
Through Secure Retirement Rationalities and Proposals
by
Jean Pierre Contzen[1] and Maurizio Martellini[2]
http://www.sgpproject.org/publications/Contzen&Martellini.html

Fuel Cells Bulletin
Volume 2004, Issue 3, March 2004, Pages 2-3
Russian breakthrough with SOFC system

The first Russian power system based on a solid oxide fuel cell has been
tested in the All-Russia Research Institute of Technical Physics, at the
Russian Federal Nuclear Centre in Snezhinsk. The experimental system
comprises a fuel cell, reformer and air pump developed and built by Russia's
Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom). The testing program was aided by
financial support from the International Science & Technical Centre (ISTC)
within its fuel cell construction initiative.

Nature 408, 398-399 (23 November 2000) | doi:10.1038/35044254
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v408/n6811/full/408398a0.htmlAnotherimportant
source of funds is the International Science and Technology Center
(ISTC), established in 1992 by the European Union, Japan, Russia an
 Russia's prize fighter
Quirin Schiermeier
When Zhores Alferov won a share of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics, he
restored pride to Russian science. But can he exploit his celebrity status
to move research up the political agenda? Quirin Schiermeier investigates.


ITSSD: Russia Can Secure Greatest Biotech Market Advances Following US, Not
EU Innovation Model

http://www.eurasiabio.org/media/news/itssd_russia_can_secure_greatest_biotech_market_advances_following_us_not_eu_innovation_model/
Copyright (c) 2008 PR Newswire Association LLC. All Rights Reserved.
PRINCETON, N.J., March 21 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In a short article
published today by the Washington Legal Foundation....
The article arose from Kogan's June 28, 2007 presentation at a symposium
convened by the Vyatka State University, Kirov, Russia, as part of a
longstanding joint Russian-US cooperative nonproliferation program overseen
by the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), Moscow, Russia.
According to Bakulina and Kogan, "The [US] federal
government['s]...transference of innovation from energy, space, and defense
to that of the private sector, and...the American experience in innovation
and intellectual property may be advantageous to use in Russia..."

http://www.wlf.org/upload/03-21-08balukina.pdf
Vol. 23 No. 14 March 21, 2008
HOW MARKET-BASED POLICIES COULD SPUR
BIOTECHNOLOGY GROWTH IN RUSSIA
by
Yelena M. Bakulina and Lawrence A. Kogan1


Science 24 April 1998:
Vol. 280. no. 5363, p. 513
DOI: 10.1126/science.280.5363.513a

Prev | Table of Contents | Next
News & Comment
DEFENSE CONVERSION:
U.S. Blacklists Russian Institutes
Richard Stone

The U.S. State Department has compiled a secret list of 20 Russian research
institutes suspected of helping Iran's missile program, and it is
restricting the flow of U.S. research funds to some of those institutes. The
existence of the list, which was revealed last week by the newspaper USA
Today, is raising concerns among some experts that it could undermine
Western efforts to steer defense scientists in the former Soviet Union into
peaceful research.

http://www.fas.org/spp/starwars/gao/nsiad97218.htm
Cooperative Threat Reduction: Review of DOD's June 1997 Report on Assistance
Provided (Letter Report, 09/05/97, GAO/NSIAD-97-218)
According to the State Department, through 1996 nearly $50 million\5
of CTR funding was provided to help support the ISTC in Russia,
including the branch offices recently opened in Belarus and
Kazakstan, and the STCU.  Although not described in DOD's report, 130
of the 320 ISTC projects underway received $41.5 million in CTR
funding.  The types of projects involved include safely disposing of
weapons-grade plutonium, improving nuclear power safety, destroying
chemical weapons, and protecting the environment.  Through 1996, the
United States provided $8 million of CTR funding to support 72 of the
87 ongoing STCU projects.  These projects cover such subjects as the

Survival lessons in Russian defense conversion
Bzhilianskaya, L.Yu.
Technology and Society Magazine, IEEE
Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 1998 Page(s):8 - 15
Digital Object Identifier   10.1109/44.663849
Summary:The period of Perestroika, beginning in the second half of the 1980s
in the former Soviet Union, was the beginning of disarmament and defense
conversion in the USSR. Most of the Soviet military capacity was
concentrated in Russia, and the conversion of the defense industry became
very complicated and painful. There are a number of definitions of the
conversion process. In Russia, defense conversion was usually understood to
be a full or partial transformation of a defense enterprise's capacity to
civilian capacity. If one analyzes the USSR and Russian governments'
policies on defense conversion during the past decade, it becomes evident
that what was planned was substantially different from what was actually
realized. In this article, I have paid attention to the outcome of the
conversion process. Conversion changed the attitude of the world towards
Russia. The image of a highly militarized society, which Russia has managed
to preserve for decades, is becoming rather dim
application of physics to medical technology, energy conversion,
plasma sterilization, and information infrastructure.

The Nuclear Weapons Complexes: Meeting the Conversion Challenge -- A
Proposal for Expanded Action

Report, Russian-American Nuclear Security Advisory Council
Author: Matthew Bunn, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the
Atom
http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/2052/nuclear_weapons_complexes.html?breadcrumb=%2F


The Coast Guard Aff:
NOTE: This includes no searches on Russia and its border guards and border
security policies

Title :   The U.S. Coast Guard's National Security Role in the Twenty First
Century

Descriptive Note : Final rept. Mar 1991-Jan 1992

Corporate Author : NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI CENTER FOR NAVAL WARFARE
STUDIES

Personal Author(s) : Stubbs, Bruce B.

Handle / proxy Url : http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA266369

Abstract : This report addresses the Coast Guard's National security role in
the next century by interviewing current and former policy & decision makers
involved in the maritime aspects of national security. The report attempts
to define the relationship between the Navy and the Coast Guard in the Post
Cold War era when the requirements for the Coast Guard to act as Commanders
of Maritime Defense Zones (MDZs) and to provide ASW capable cutters has been
dramatically lessened. The author suggests the definition of national
security needs to expand and that the Coast Guard provide increased support
for US CINCS especially in security assistance and low order crisis
response. The role of the US Coast Guard as the force manager/force provider
for coastal patrol boats is also studied. The need for a viable national
defense role for the Coast Guard is examined and the implications of a lack
of a well-defined, needed role assessed. Coast Guard, Maritime defense
zones, Patrol boats, Alien interdiction, Drug interdiction, Security
assistance, Navy-Coast Guard relationship, Navy-Coast Guard Board

Securing Tyrants or Fostering Reform?
U.S. Internal Security Assistance to Repressive and Transitioning Regimes


Security Assistance in the War on Terrorism
Authors: Dino Roth; Mary Gilliam; Vic Mattes; NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV NORFOLK
VA JOINTFORCES STAFF COLL
http://www.stormingmedia.us/48/4851/A485124.html
During a recent field trip to Washington, D.C., by students from the Joint
Forces Staff College, virtually every briefer spoke on transformation in one
context or another, from those at the National Security Council and The
Joint Staff, to the speakers at the U.S. Coast Guard.
http://rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG550/


http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-27313578_ITM
The United States Coast Guard's Integrated Deepwater System: Creating
opportunities for enhanced interoperability with America's friends and
allies. (Feature Article).

Publication: DISAM Journal

Publication Date: 22-DEC-01
Author: Giddens, Gregory L.


The Coast Guard is also a key player in the U.S. security assistance arena.
Foreign military sales (FMS), including the transfer of excess defense
articles, have long been an integral element of Coast Guard international
engagement. Asset sales and transfers contribute directly to the Coast
Guard's accomplishment of its own missions and helps achieve broader U.S.
engagement goals, all the while helping our friends protect their maritime
security and safety goals.


Enhancing International Collaboration for Homeland Security and
Counterterrorism
by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. and Richard Weitz, Ph.D.
Backgrounder #2078
http://www.heritage.org/research/HomelandDefense/bg2078.cfm

Coast Guard: Observations on the Fiscal Year 2009 Budget, Recent
Performance, and Related Challenges, GAO-08-494T, March 6, 2008

Maritime Security: Coast Guard Inspections Identify and Correct Facility
Deficiencies, but More Analysis Needed of Program's Staffing, Practices, and
Data, GAO-08-12, February 14, 2008


Moroney, Jennifer.  "The Impact of US Security Cooperation Efforts on
Military Change in Central Asia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of
the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu,
Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2008-04-22 <
http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p71330_index.html>
http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/0/7/1/3/3/p71330_index.html
    Name: International Studies Association
    URL: http://www.isanet.org
his paper will examine how US Government security cooperation programs and
activities, executed by the Departments of Defense, State, and Homeland
Security (i.e., US Coast Guard), are able to promote military institutional
change in our partner countries.


itle :   Defense Security Cooperation: A Proven Access Enabler for
Operational Commanders

Descriptive Note : Research paper

Corporate Author : NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI JOINT MILITARY OPERATIONS DEPT

Personal Author(s) : Kiple, Brian R.

Handle / proxy Url : http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA422830
Illustrative examples of security cooperation in new reach areas of the Horn
of Africa, Central Asia, and the Asian Littorals will be used to demonstrate
the effectiveness of security cooperation as an access enabler for
operational commanders. As America enters the 21st Century, the requirement
for overseas access will not abate; it will most likely increase in response
to emerging threats associated with terrorism and global dysfunction.
Combatant commanders will be reliant upon the goodwill of friendly and
neutral nations for future access. Security cooperation provides the means
to positively influence the willingness of foreign governments to permit
access to their territory. Combatant commanders must capitalize on the
access enabling power of security cooperation. Security Cooperation
activities described in this paper include humanitarian demining in the
country of Djibouti; peacekeeping exercises in Uzbekistan, known as
CENTRAZBAT; the transfer of a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter to Azerbaijan

The U.S. Navy's Role in Executing the Maritime CONOPS for U.S. Homeland
Security/Defense
Authors: Eric C. Young; NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI JOINT MILITARY OPERATIONS
DEPT
http://www.stormingmedia.us/35/3585/A358504.html
 The terrorist events of September 11, 2001, have necessitated a complete
rethinking of U.S. Homeland Security and Defense (HLS/D). The Navy's role in
Maritime HLS/D is to support the Coast Guard, however, the Coast Guard does
not have the resources available to combat this problem alone. The Navy
provides capability to perform the specified, implied, and essential tasks
required to meet Maritime HLS/D objectives. The Navy and Coast Guard require
a simple, effective, integrated CONOPS to accomplish maritime HLS/D.

Security Cooperation and Non-State Threats:
A Call for an Integrated Strategy
Colonel Albert Zaccor
U.S. Army
Atlantic Council Senior Fellow
Occasional Paper
August 2005
http://www.acus.org/docs/0508-Security_Cooperation_NonState_Threats_Zaccor_Albert.pdf


Realigning Coast Guard Enhanced Maritime Capabilities: A Lesson Learned -
all 2 versions ?
CSD Poulin - 2005 - strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil
... Enhanced Maritime Capabilities Command (CGEMCC) - as a more effective
and efficient
means for the Coast Guard to execute its homeland security responsibilities
...
https://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/ksil258.pdf


A Military Strategy For Central Asia - all 4 versions ?
JE Chicky - 2004 - carlisle-www.army.mil
... Departments of State, Defense, and Homeland Security with ... SOF, the
United States
Coast Guard (USCG), US ... DTRA, and the Defense Security Cooperation Agency
would ...
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/ssi/ksil/files/00068.doc

3. A Framework for Developing Niche Capabilities Using Security Cooperation:
Case Study ofthe" ?
B Sustainable - Building Sustainable And Effective Military Capabilities: A
?, 2004 - books.google.com
... Defense, Energy, Treasury, and Homeland Security provide ... informed
decisions about
security cooperation resource allocations. ... the Coast Guard (both of
which are ...
http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=amanFL46_KYC&oi=fnd&pg=PA149&dq=%22coast+guard%22+%22security+cooperation%22+homeland&ots=QUjPhquT_H&sig=3P_w58_ko55rLvnQq6k0unPPDyk
February 17, 2005
Making the Sea Safer: A National Agenda for Maritime Security and
Counterterrorism
by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., and Alane Kochems
Special Report #03
http://www.heritage.org/Research/HomelandSecurity/sr03.cfm

What Does Homeland Security Spending Buy?
Veronique de Rugy
American Enterprise Institute
http://www.aei.org/docLib/20050401_wp107.pdf
We conclude that a large portion of homeland security-spending decisions are
made on a
political basis rather than on a sound cost-benefit analysis, leading to the
traditional
public choice failures that plague government spending more generally. As a
result,
homeland security funding is likely to be misallocated, resulting in a less
than optimal
level of security in America.

The war on energy: why the United States and the international community
need cohesive energy infrastructure security policy.

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&lr=&q=info:23TakUmDSv8J:scholar.google.com/&output=viewport
Hous. J. Int'l L., 2006
29: 453

Annual Review of Environment and Resources
Vol. 29: 421-469 (Volume publication date November 2004)
(doi:10.1146/annurev.energy.29.062403.102238)
First published online as a Review in Advance on August 16, 2004
ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE AND SECURITY

Alexander E. Farrell,1 ? Hisham Zerriffi,2 and ? Hadi Dowlatabadi3?
1Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, California
94720-3050; email: afarrell at socrates.berkeley.edu
2Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213-3890; email: hisham at cmu.edu
3Sustainable Development Research Initiative, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z2; email: hadi at sdri.ubc.ca
This review discusses how energy infrastructure and security are related,
how this relationship differs from traditional energy security concepts, and
what it may mean for private and policy decisions. Key concepts include
redundancy, diversity, resilience, storage, decentralization, and
interdependence. The concept of CIP is still relatively new and is likely to
evolve over time, possibly away from a "guards, gates, and guns" defensive
approach and toward a design approach that yields systems that are
inherently harder to successfully attack. Such survivable systems may
feature distributed intelligence, control, and operations.


Critical Infrastructure Protection in Homeland Security: Defending a
Networked Nation
 Medium: Hardcover
Year of Publication: 2006
ISBN:0471786284
Author
Ted G. Lewis

Willard Price (2004) Reducing the Risk of Terror Events at Seaports1
Review of Policy Research 21 (3) , 329?349
doi:10.1111/j.1541-1338.2004.00079.x
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1541-1338.2004.00079.x

The US Military and Civil Infrastructure Protection: Restrictions and
Discretion under the Posse ?
GD Grove - 1999 - ciaonet.org
... In the case of infrastructure protection, the federal government and
military were
early ... tion does not apply the Coast Guard, 50 members of the Reserve
force ...
http://www.ciaonet.org/wps/grg02/GrovePosseComitatus99.pdf

June 16, 2003
Budgets and Threats: An Analysis of Strategic Priorities for Maritime
Security
by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D.
Heritage Lecture #791
http://www.heritage.org/Research/HomelandSecurity/HL791.cfm

DEFENDING AGAINST THE APOCALYPSE: THE LIMITS OF HOMELAND SECURITY
M Barkun - POLICY, 2002 - irpp.org
... Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), augmented by the Customs
Service, Border
Patrol, Coast Guard, National Infrastructure Protection Center, and a ...
http://www.irpp.org/po/archive/sep02/barkun.pdf

Homeland Security Affairs - Volume I, Issue 2: Fall 2005 -
Maritime Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multi-Agency Command and
Control in an Asymmetric Environment
http://www.hsaj.org/?article=1.2.3
The United States has faced military threats in its littoral before, and
lessons from the past offer value in determining how to defend ports in the
modern era. But these lessons must be considered in light of the new
asymmetric terrorist threat. By

Challenges in Critical Infrastructure Protection
Final Report for the 2006/2007 Sam Nunn Security Program Critical
Infrastructure Protection Exercise
2 November 2006
http://www.janosburg.net/publications/2006_SNSP_CIP_NSC_report_web.pdf


But seriously, I bet that this is all that has ever been written by anyone
that is relevant to those Affs, so I have now, on edebate, pretty much
exhausted all the possibilities for the year in those areas. My research on
single-payer care systems was much more interesting.
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